Equestrian: David Somerset, 11th Duke of Beaufort, dies…

David Somerset 11th Duke Of Beaufort David Robert Somerset 11th Duke Of Beaufort (born 23 February 1928) Known As David Somerset Until 1984 Is A British Peer. He Is The Son Of Henry Robert Somers Fitzroy De Vere Somerset And Bettine Violet Malcolm An
David Somerset, the 11th Duke of Beaufort, who has died at the age of 89

David Somerset, the 11th Duke of Beaufort, died peacefully at his home at Badminton yesterday (August 16). He was 89.

The duke, who inherited the title from his cousin in 1984, played a significant part in both eventing and hunting.

He was an excellent horseman, finishing second at the Badminton Horse Trials – the event founded by the 10th Duke in 1949 and held in the grounds ever since – in 1959 when riding Countryman III. He was also a keen hunting man.

As such, he joined the mastership of the family pack of hounds, the Duke of Beaufort’s, in 1974 and continued to be joint master until his death.

He leaves behind his second wife Miranda Morley who, as Miranda Beaufort, has competed to a high level in dressage, and four children. He married Morley in 2000 following the death of his first wife Lady caroline Thynne, who helped him to restore and maintain both the estate, Badminton House and its gardens.

Eventing: ‘Horse of a lifetime’ Toytown put down, aged 25…

EQUESTRIAN Burghley Horse Trials
‘Horse of a lifetime!’: Toytown in action with Zara Tindall

Zara Tindall’s ‘horse of a lifetime’ Toytown has been put down at the age of 25 for medical reasons.

Under Tindall, Toytown won individual European eventing gold in 2005 and world gold in 2006, before he was retired from competition in 2011.

In a statement, the Queen’s grand-daughter said: ‘I’m heartbroken that I had to say goodbye to my greatest friend and horse of a lifetime, Toytown. He was the most incredible athlete with the biggest heart.

‘He made my career and I couldn’t be more grateful to him for the amazing times we had together. I will miss you forever.’

Tindall bought Toytown as a seven-year-old in 1999. Injuries to the horse prevented them from competing at the Olympic Games in 2004 and 2008.

However, the pair won both the European individual and team gold in 2005. That was followed by world individual gold and team silver the following year and European team gold in 2007.

Paying his own tribute to Toytown on Twitter, Zara’s husband Mike Tindall said:

Eventing: Andrew Nicholson wins first ever Badminton title…

260px-Andrew_Nicholson_Nereo_Staircase_Badminton_2010
New Zealand’s Andrew Nicholson aboard Nereo at Badminton in 2015. He won his first title earlier today

It has taken 37 attempts but New Zealand’s Andrew Nicholson finally has his first Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials title!

Nicholson’s debut win, at one of eventing’s most prestigious 4* competitions, comes just two years after the 55-year-old suffered a serious neck injury in a fall. He first competed in the event in 1984.

Sitting third overnight after yesterday’s tricky cross country phase, Nicholson, who was riding the 17-year-old Nereo, jumped clear incurring only one time fault – but that was enough to seal victory.

German rider Michael Jung, who had won the Kentucky three-day-event just a week earlier and was riding La Biosthetique Sam FBW, had a fence down for second place, finishing just 2.6 penalties behind Andrew.

Overnight leaders Ingrid Klimke and Horseware Hale Bob OLD had a nightmare on course, with three fences down, a stop and seven time faults, meaning the win was handed to the New Zealander and a ninth place overall finish for Klimke.

Klimke had been bidding to become the first female rider to win Badminton since Australian rider Lucinda Fredericks in 2007.

Nicholson’s fellow compatriot Tim Price finished in third place, after picking up a total of 49.2 penalties aboard Xavier Faer.

Best of the British contingent was Rosalind Canter, who finished in fifth place after a clear round in the final phase, riding her own and Caroline Moore’s 11-year-old Allstar B.

Gemma Tattersall jumped a massive 60 places after jumping a double clear on former racehorse Arctic Soul. She had finished 67th after the dressage phase.

Seasoned campaigner Tina Cook finished 10th with one of two young horses, Billy the Red, while another Kiwi, Sir Mark Todd finished in fourth and sixth with NZB Campino and Leonidas II respectively.

Japanese rider Yoshiaki Oiwa finished in eighth with 62.2 penalties aboard The Duke of Cavan – the highest ever finish for a Japanese rider at Badminton.

Looking to the future, British rider Tom McEwen and his 10-year-old horse Toledo De Kerser, which he co-owns with Jane Inns and Ali McEwen, finished just outside the top 10 in 11th place.

Final standings (top 10)…
1. Andrew Nicholson (NZ) (Nereo) 41.4 pens
2. Michael Jung (Germany) (La Biosthetique Sam FBW) 44
3. Tim Price (NZ) (Xavier Faer) 49.2
4. Mark Todd (NZ) (NZB Campino) 50.4
5. Rosalind Canter (GB) (Allstar B) 54.5
6. Mark Todd (NZ) (Leonidas II) 58.1
7. Gemma Tattersall (GB) (Arctic Soul) 60.2
8. Yoshiaki Oiwa (Japan) (The Duke of Cavan) 62.2
9. Ingrid Klimke (Germany) (Horseware Hale Bob) 62.6
10. Kristina Cook (GB) (Billy the Red) 63.4

¬†New Zealand’s Andrew Nicholson speaks to Horse & Country TV following his first ever Badminton Horse Trials title (Video courtesy of H&C Youtube channel)